Author Archives: cazehner

About cazehner

I'm a woman who loves God's Word, the Bible. And I love sharing what it is God reveals to me through his Word. I pray that everything I write is consistent with Scripture, and that everyone who reads this blog will be drawn closer to the Savior. I am praying for you.

May 21; Answer The Door

Song of Solomon 5-8; Psalm 45; I Kings 5:1-12; 2 Chronicles 2:2-16

She’d just gone to bed when she heard her lover at the door. “Really?” she thought, “I just put on my PJ’s. Does he expect me to get dressed again at this hour? I washed my feet, and they’ll just get dirty again if I go to the door. Can’t it wait until morning?”

She laid there for just a minute or two before her heart began to beat with the anticipation of seeing him again, of being in his presence. She got up to greet the one she loved.

He was gone.

Some people may recognize how much God loves them and want to have a relationship with Him, but they are comfortable in their lives. They think, “I’ll give my heart to the Lord when I’m a little older, after I live a bit.”

Some Christians have a relationship with God through Jesus. But they hesitate to fully surrender because they are comfortable with an arms-length relationship at the moment. “Can’t it wait until morning?”

God doesn’t stay where He’s not wanted, and He never forces Himself on us. It’s up to us to go to Him, to open the door.

The good news for these people is that God will always forgive a repentant heart. He will welcome them with open arms whenever they come to Him through Jesus. “Behold, I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in..: (Revelation 3:20)

The bad news is, they will never get a repeat of today. If they ignore Jesus today, they will miss out on what God has for them today.

When we ignore God’s call on our lives we forfeit something truly amazing. And, let’s face it – we aren’t even promised a tomorrow.

I don’t know if you’ve been a Christian for decades, or whether you’ve never given your heart to the Lord. But I do know He is knocking at the door. He wants to forgive you, to fill you, to bless you more than you can imagine.

Why hesitate? You’ll never have this exact moment ever again.

May 20; Living In His Embrace

Psalm 50; Song of Solomon 1-3

There is so much imagery here in the love poem Solomon wrote. I hope you’ll read it with your relationship with your Savior in mind. Today, I am filled with praise for the great love God has for me, and for the privilege of being His.

Like an apple tree among the trees of the forest is my lover among the young men. I delight to sit in his shade, and his fruit is sweet to my taste. He has taken me to the banquet hall, and his banner over me is love. Strengthen me with raisins, refresh me with apples, for I am faint with love. His left arm is under my head, and his right arm embraces me. (2:3-6)

That’s where I want to be living. I want to rest in my Savior, to be strengthened and nourished by reading His Word to me, because I love Him so much. I want to be living in His embrace.

He wants that for me, too.

May 19; What if?

I Kings 2:13-3:28; 2 Chronicles 1:1-13; Psalm 72

How would you describe God? What do you believe about Jesus and the cross? In your experience, would you say the Bible is absolutely true, mostly true, a book of suggestions for living, or a book of fiction? The answers to those questions will determine your answer to the following:

If God promised He would give you anything you asked of Him, what would you say?

Solomon heard God say, “Ask for whatever you want me to give you.” Can you even imagine? Solomon replied, “Give me whatever I need to accomplish Your will.”

Solomon understood who God is. He understood that nothing is more important than being a servant God deserves. Solomon not only wanted to do what God asked of him, he wanted to do it well, with his efforts empowered by God.

What if God told you you could have anything you want? Would you ask for health? Happiness? World peace?

Or do you love Him enough, fear Him enough, desire to serve Him enough to make your request about Him? Not my will, but Thine be done.

How would you describe God?

 

May 18; Clinging To The Altar

I Kings 1:1-2:12; Psalm 25: 2 Samuel 23:1-7; I Chronicles 29:23-30

Warren Wiersbe said something about this passage that has me thinking today. (With the Word; Oliver-Nelson Books, 1991; page 197). David was old and dying. God had told him Solomon would succeed him as King of Israel.

However, another son, Adonijah, had other ideas. Adonijah gathered support, including some of David’s top men, and made himself king before David died, and before Solomon was anointed in their father’s  place.

As soon as David heard what was happening, he took matters in hand and made Solomon king in a very official, very public way. Then he had King Solomon sit down on his throne in front of the world.

When Adonijah and his cronies heard the news, they panicked and ran for the hills. I’m sure the words “treason” and “death” were ringing loudly in their ears. Adonijah ran, too. But he didn’t run for the hills, he ran to the altar of God, grabbed hold of the horns of the altar, and stayed right there. He wasn’t there to offer a sacrifice for his sin. He wasn’t there to meet God. He was there because he thought the altar was as safe a place as any. Surely Solomon wouldn’t kill him while he clung to the altar of God, would he?

Wiersbe likens this to people who cling to their religion. “Adonijah fled to the altar for safety, not for sanctity.”

Some people feel “safe” if they attend church, write a check, volunteer at the church’s food kitchen or clothing closet, if they take communion, or pray a row of beads, if they’re baptized, or sing in the choir. They cling to the horns of the altar without letting the altar do its work in them, to change them, to deal with the sin in their lives.

I want to ask you a question today. Are you religious? Or do you have a personal relationship with God through the blood of Jesus? I’m asking myself the same thing.

May 17; March Offerings

I Chronicles 27:1-29:22; I Kings 1:1-27

King David had arranged to purchase everything needed to build the temple – from the sturdy foundation to the eating utensils – including hiring skilled workers in every area. Then he did something that spoke to me today:

He reached into his own pockets, took out his personal checkbook, and gave treasures of gold and silver; 3,000 talents of gold and 7,000 talents of silver to be used for the finishing touches of the temple. Not from the nation’s treasury. From his own pocket.

Then he challenged the nation’s leaders to give, too. The result was that the leaders, the commanders, officers and officials, reached into their own pockets and followed David’s example. They gave over 5,000 talents of gold, 10,000 talents of silver, 18,000 talents of bronze, 100,000 talents of iron from their private funds. Then, on top of that, they threw in the precious stones they had lying around their houses.

The people rejoiced at the willing response of their leaders, for they had given freely and wholeheartedly to the Lord… (I Chronicles 29:9)

Now I know that we are very private givers these days. We quote the account of the widow’s mite and, with Jesus, condemn the showy, public giving of the rich. But it occurred to me today, the widow’s offering was every bit as public. In fact, Jesus drew attention to the dollar amount she gave.

I remember the occasional March Offering when I was a kid. The congregation, usually singing a familiar hymn, would get out of our pews, and form a line, following one another to an offering plate at the front of the sanctuary, where one at a time, we’d all put in whatever God laid on our hearts. No one announced individual dollar amounts like Jesus did. But the act of public giving was celebrated. The total dollar amount received, usually for a special project or mission, was announced at the end of the service, followed by praise and thanksgiving.

I recently heard someone reject that idea for their congregation because “that only tempts prideful giving and jealousy.” This person has a general negative view of people anyway, but I wonder if that congregation missed out on something here.

The people we read about in I Chronicles 29 got excited about giving when they saw David giving. I know for myself, as a young girl in my church, those march offerings spoke to me. I watched an example of giving by my elders. And I remember the first time I marched around the sanctuary and put in my own  offering, a dollar I’d earned babysitting. I didn’t feel bad about the small amount. I wasn’t jealous that someone else was able to give more. I was excited to be a part of the giving.

I’m wondering if we’ve become too private in our giving. If no one knows that I give, they don’t know that I don’t. And yes, what I give it is between me and God. But are we missing the opportunity to be an example of giving to others?

Are you a church leader? Do people in your fellowship know you tithe? Do they see you denying yourself certain things in order to give a bit extra? Are you a parent? Do your kids know you give, how much you give, and why? I think they should know.

Let’s be an example of joyful, sacrificial giving to our families and our church fellowships. Let’s not make giving such a taboo subject. It’s a responsibility to give. But it is also a privilege, and a blessing. Maybe others, if they see our example, will want to give, too.

May 16; How Far Will It Go?

I Chronicles 6:31-53, 25:1-26:32

I love that the names of the men assigned tasks in the ministry of the temple (not even built yet) are listed here. Most of these men are unknown, regular guys – except for this one thing. Most of these men aren’t listed with kings, or warriors, or prophets. Yet their names are being read today, thousands of years after they’ve gone.

Why?

They served God.

I also love the fact that so many fathers and sons worked side by side in their ministries. I would think nothing could be sweeter for Christian parents than to have their children serving God alongside them. What a blessing that must be!

There is something else that I noticed here in these lists: Accountability.

All these men were assigned duties, and with that we read about the supervision of their fathers, or the commanders, or those who were “in charge.” All the men were given jobs, but none of them did their “own thing.” Even those with authority still answered to the king.

This is a great picture of the inner workings of the Church, isn’t it? Ordinary people working shoulder-to-shoulder in various ministries, some with the responsibility to oversee, to ensure the works gets done to the glory of God, and ultimately, all are accountable to the King of Kings.

You and I might be just regular people, working behind the scenes in ministry of some kind. We might never be lauded or applauded in this lifetime. The men whose names we read today probably weren’t, either. But here we are so many years later, talking about them. I guess we’ll never know how far-reaching our obedience in ministry will go, either.

May 15; Building The Church

I Chronicles 23-24, 6:16-30

I’ve shared that my church is in the middle of a building project. We are excited about moving forward, to laying a foundation now that the land is cleared, to see walls go up, and to eventually move to the north end of the island. The drawings of our future home are beautiful. Not ornate. But you’ll definitely be able to identify it as a church, unlike the remodeled garage we worship in today. It’s so exciting.

David was excited about his building project, too. We saw yesterday how he did the prep-work, buying materials and hiring skilled workers. David even went one step further, an unimaginable step, when he made Solomon king in his place. A king just didn’t do that. Death was the only thing that removed a king from a throne, or maybe an enemy victory. Never a willing abdication in favor of a son.

I imagine David was hoping he’d live long enough to at least see the temple built, even if God had told him Solomon was going to be the builder.

But, and here’s what spoke to me today, David wasn’t only concerned about the physical building of the temple. Oh, he wanted it done right, with the best materials. He wanted it to be the most beautiful building in the world. But David was not satisfied with a  beautiful structure. What use would it be if there wasn’t ministry happening there?

So, even before the foundation of the building was laid, he assigned people to be gatekeepers, musicians, officials, judges, bakers, dish washers, as well as priests. David doesn’t seem to be satisfied with the outward appearance, and not with what was to happen inside.

It’s nice to worship in a beautiful building with state-of-the-art technology, comfortable chairs and air-conditioning. But if there isn’t ministry happening in there, what good is it? The size or appearance of our churches are meaningless if God isn’t finding willing workers inside.

There are vital, beautiful churches that meet huddled together in someone’s living room, or in buildings with holes in the roof, and dirt floors. There are amazing churches meeting in store fronts, in tents, or barns where people are gathering together to worship, and grow, and then getting out there and making disciples.

Sometimes I think we put too much emphasis on the physical, how our churches look, from the size of a steeple to the look of a stage, from how the landscaping looks to how the worship service looks, we neglect the ministry opportunities and responsibilities.

Let’s take care of our buildings, make sure the bills are paid and the lawn is mowed and the toilets flush. But let’s also remember why we have those buildings in the first place. Are we using them during the week for ministry, or only on Sunday for a couple hours? Are we who meet on Sundays sharing the Gospel when we leave those four walls, or are we only there for an experience?

You know the Church is not a building. It’s important to take care of our meeting places, but the Church is you. It’s me. Building God’s Church doesn’t involve hammers and nails, but men and women who are out there serving, ministering, people who are involved in the lives of other people, and leading them to their Savior.

I pray that we will have the same singular focus on growing the Church as David had in seeing that temple built. Let’s build the Church one redeemed soul at a time.