I Kings 3-4; Church Finance According To Solomon

A thought came to mind as I read about the wisdom of Solomon this morning. He divided his country into twelve districts. Each district was assigned a month of the year to provide the supplies Solomon would need to run his empire for that month. This was no small responsibility. Look at what Solomon required:

thirty cors of fine flour, sixty cors of meal, ten stall-fed cows, twenty pasture fed cows, one hundred sheep and goats, plus deer, gazelle, roebuck, and birds… A DAY!

Multiply that by thirty and you’ll come up with what each district paid during their month every year.

Now here’s my thought: What if our churches quit passing the offering plate every Sunday. What if we divided our membership into twelve families, and each group was responsible to pay the church’s bills one month out of the year. This would take care of the deficit most churches operate under.

There could be a provision for those not responsible for a given month, or for those who want to give more. The money they give could go to a rainy day fund, a mission trip, or a building fund.

Do you know what it costs to operate your church each month? Utilities, salary, insurance, mortgage…? I bet it’s not a fraction of what the Israelites under Solomon paid.

Like I said, it’s just a thought. I know Solomon was running a country, and not a church with this plan. But the wisest man who ever lived established this manner of giving, and the Holy Spirit inspired men to include it in His Word.

Makes me wonder.

2 thoughts on “I Kings 3-4; Church Finance According To Solomon

  1. Joseph Gribbin

    But, Connie, this would require discipline and budgeting on the part of the members who get paid monthly or weekly. Do you think there’s a lot of that missing today?

    Reply

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